Buy Bitcoin with MoneyGram Paxful

/u/nter Rep Profile

rep profile #4
https://www.reddit.com/BitMarket/comments/7hv3nc/wtb_btc_with_paypal/dqu4qa1/
https://www.reddit.com/Cash4Cash/comments/7g180z/h_155_paypall_w_bitcoin_90/dqg3esc/?context=1
https://www.reddit.com/Cash4Cash/comments/7fkduh/h_paypal_w_btc/dqck6na/
https://www.reddit.com/Cash4Cash/comments/7f3jvd/h_70_paypal_w_65_circle_pay_or_65_square_cash/dq9cjlf/
https://www.reddit.com/BitcoinBeginners/comments/78sweh/purchasing_bitcoin_under_18/dq7bnn9/
https://www.reddit.com/BitMarket/comments/7e6kl2/wtb_using_paypal/dq4swe3/
https://www.reddit.com/BitMarket/comments/7ce7cx/wtb_around_100_in_bitcoin/dq0xoey/
https://www.reddit.com/Cash4Cash/comments/7dh63x/h_150_paypal_w_btc/dpxrp1f/
https://www.reddit.com/Cash4Cash/comments/7cufvh357_paypal_balance_verified_account_can_provide/dpx2ams/
https://www.reddit.com/slavelaboucomments/7c41b9/task_need_a_walmart_egiftcard/dpry39t/
https://www.reddit.com/Cash4Cash/comments/7c6jys/h_220_paypal_w_200_btc/dpnnp4l/
https://www.reddit.com/Cash4Cash/comments/7bydk5/h_283_paypal_w_270_squarecash_or_btc/dpm6ng0/
https://www.reddit.com/Cash4Cash/comments/7btoe7/h_20_paypal_w_19_google_wallet/dpkwpt5/
https://www.reddit.com/Cash4Cash/comments/7bfy5d/h_10_paypal_w_9_google_wallet/dphpgsg/
https://www.reddit.com/Cash4Cash/comments/7b49j0/h_paypal_w_90_btc_eth_possibly_other_alt_coin/dpf3lhs/
https://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/7acdpn/how_can_i_buy_bitcoin_if_i_am_under_18/dpeltmz/
https://www.reddit.com/BitMarket/comments/7b06he/wtb200_bitcoin/dpeffe9/?context=1
https://www.reddit.com/BitMarket/comments/7anzjn/wtb_bitcoin/dpbhmuk/
https://www.reddit.com/BitMarket/comments/78hoj8/wtb_bitcoin_for_cash_app_funds/doy8ng2/
https://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/78c3xq/how_do_i_purchase_bitcoin_with_paypal/dow609z/
https://www.reddit.com/Cash4Cash/comments/78nkrv/h_50_visa_gift_card_w_btc_preferably_45/dov6j0z/
https://www.reddit.com/BitMarket/comments/77wk56/wts_90_amazon_gift_code_for_0013_btc/dopr6nh/
https://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/767p1j/any_idea_how_to_buy_bitcoin_in_a_state_that/dopnqud/
https://www.reddit.com/BitMarket/comments/76w40m/wtb_cryptos_with_paypal/doj4ff5/
https://www.reddit.com/BitMarket/comments/76w40m/wtb_cryptos_with_paypal/dohgypc/
https://www.reddit.com/Cash4Cash/comments/7619c5/h_45_paypal_w_btc/doaihr4/
https://www.reddit.com/Cash4Cash/comments/74k98w/h125_paypal_w_110_squarecash/dnyyeks/
https://www.reddit.com/BitMarket/comments/743z0s/wtb_002_75_btc_with_paypal/dnveeat/
https://www.reddit.com/Cash4Cash/comments/70ulg9/h_120_paypal_w_btc_or_ltc_equivalent_interest/dn6el4u/
https://www.reddit.com/Paypaltobitcoin/comments/70m571/quick_transaction_00631_btc_2256/dn48tsd/
https://www.reddit.com/giftcards/comments/6zw782/anyone_selling_amazon_gift_cards/dmzbfv4/
https://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/6zxeu0/what_is_the_best_way_to_buy_bitcoin_with_a/dmz8kod/
https://www.reddit.com/borrow/comments/6ztvb6/meta_swap_squarecash_for_paypal/dmyg44c/
https://www.reddit.com/BitMarket/comments/6yjr21/wtb_100_usd_for_like_95_usd_worth_of_btc/dmw4e7z/
https://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/6zfyec/buying_low_quantities_of_bitcoin/dmw043y/
https://www.reddit.com/CryptoTrade/comments/6ynijs/wtb_005_btc_for_250_paypal/dmsje20/
https://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/6wkrii/buying_bitcoin_with_paypal/dmc1zrh/
https://www.reddit.com/redditbay/comments/6tvna3/trading_300_visa_prepaid_gift_card_for_09_eth_odlo91by/?context=1
https://www.reddit.com/GCtrade/comments/6tn870/w_15_bitcoin_h_20_paypal/dllz1ra/
https://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/6snz20/purchasing_small_amounts/dleuf5d/
https://www.reddit.com/BitMarket/comments/6smts1/wtb_35usd_in_btc_via_paypal/dldz3ve/
https://www.reddit.com/BitcoinBeginners/comments/6sb8mt/help_me_with_bitcoin_please/dldyw4y/
https://www.reddit.com/giftcardexchange/comments/6pwv8a/h_90_moneypak_w_xbox_gold_movie_credit_amazon_gc/dl4xy4d/
https://www.reddit.com/BitMarket/comments/6qziuu/wtb_75_in_bitcoin_can_pay_instantly_on_venmo/dl1jb1d/
https://www.reddit.com/BitcoinBeginners/comments/6qdl1d/im_a_us_citizen_in_africa_for_a_while_how_to_buy/dkytoc6/
https://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/6q6vi6/i_need_to_buy_bitcoin_fast_with_paypal/dkv8mv1/
https://www.reddit.com/GCtrade/comments/6pxlvx/h_american_express_gc_250_w_paypal_240/dkt8378/
https://www.reddit.com/slavelaboucomments/6ozbl4/task_ship_me_a_knife_from_elemental_knives/dkm2685/
https://www.reddit.com/BitMarket/comments/6oioz3/wtb_bitcoin/dkhnefc/
https://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/6nmi5q/where_to_buy_with_paypaldebit_card_and_no/dkgnt40/
https://www.reddit.com/BitMarket/comments/6o5ek4/wtb_bitcoin/dkew60d/
https://www.reddit.com/BitMarket/comments/6njk9x/wtb_50_in_bitcoin_h_60_pp/dk9xsnb/
https://www.reddit.com/BitMarket/comments/6nfhum/wtb_up_to_100_in_bitcoin/dk92zhx/
https://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/6m7fha/where_to_buy_25_worth_of_btc/dk5ifrg/?context=1
https://www.reddit.com/slavelaboucomments/6mk0d1/task_need_someone_to_purchase_humble_monthly_as_a/dk28l3v/?context=1
https://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/6d0358/is_there_anywhere_left_where_i_can_still_buy/diu0q4k/
submitted by nter to SLRep [link] [comments]

How to buy these cheap coins right now

Since we've all been goxxed now is the time to buy those $50-60 coins floating around and profit from everybody else's misery. Or you could wait for Gox to come back online and crash down the price even further but good luck trying to do any trading there to buy coins, the trading engine is already broken I don't expect the new one to work flawlessly due to epic 3yr history of GOXXING
BTC-E.com
To pay into this exchange, you need a BTC-E code, PM or Okpay. Take pics of your ID and utility bill and pay the $10 to Okpay for 'quick verification'. You can pay bitcoins directly into your Okpay account for initial funding or wait and see how long it takes for reg verification.
Now either wire money, or instant money transfer (MoneyPolo, Contact-sys, Unistream) to fund your account or find an Okpay exchanger somewhere. Or Ukash/CashU. Just because contact-sys is Russian doesn't mean there aren't sending points in every country in the world.
BTC-E codes you buy on #bitcoin-otc from verified gpg authenticated traders with good ratings, or on bitcointalk.org forums in the currency exchange forums.
Perfect Money is a shady HYIP digital currency run by Russians much like Liberty Reserve. You sign up for free, and load your account with wires (if verified) or you use an exchanger. This is what talkgold.com is for to find legit exchangers. I use wm-center.com to wire WU/Moneygram and get PM. Click on 'Interkassa' payment method in BTC-E and select Perfect Money. Instant load.
You can also obviously dump Litecoins you bought on Vircurex to fund the account, or a gagillion PPcoins
Bitfloor.com
Fastest way to deposit is through CapitalOne P2P or cash deposit https://bitfloor.com/docs/#funding-deposit
Be aware Bitfloor is insolvent due to owing 25k bitcoins that were stolen last year but they have a repayment schedule that may or may not bankrupt them. Use at own risk but most ppl trade there everyday with no problems.
Bitstamp.net
Great exchange in Slovakia? I think. You have to pay with Euro SEPA wire, then for some stupid reason they convert the money to USD. You can pay in here using transferwise.com if you're from UK, or XEtrade and other Forex online money transfer companies. Google 'free money transfer fx' and review your options. Most don't charge you anything if over a certain amount of money. They take your internet billing or other local payment, convert to EUR and send SEPA for you if you request it. If they don't then check with Bitstamp what a SWIFT wire costs (probably nothing, I think they use Latvian banks that charge no receiving fees). If you want a bank account in Latvia then sign up here: http://www.rietumu.com/ if you have a local corporation or business where you live you can, maybe a personal account too. You can always incorporate a dirt cheap Delaware LLC or Oregon LLC from anywhere in the world and use it to open up worldwide bank accounts.
Bitcoin-24.com
Takes direct wires, all sorts of other methods: https://bitcoin-24.com/fees You can also use Liqpay if you have a USD or EUR card. Sign up to liqpay.com, then they block a small verification amount you have to sign into internet banking (for the card) to check. It's usually $1.something or less. After that you are verified to load $1-100 or so, but I'd just try $50 at first. Any more than that and Liqpay will seize the funds and ask for your bank to authorize a fax they send which no bank will do because of privacy reasons, so pointless to load anymore money. Liqpay may also call you to verify card details this is normal. Liqpay is meant for Russians and CIS countries to use like Ukraine so due to epic fraud of credit cards don't expect to load too much this way unless you find a Liqpay exchanger, but what's the point when you can just wire money to bitcoin-24 anyways.
Vircurex.com
Good exchange, had some problems due to DDoS but so did all exchanges. They only accept BTC, altcoins and VouchX for payment. You buy Vouchx here: https://www.aurumxchange.com/ or from somebody on Bitcointalk, or IRC (with rep). You can buy a bunch of litecoins anywhere to fund this exchange such as the bitcointalk forums or IRC. Warning: the so-called official twitter account is fake, don't use it.
Cavirtex.com
Can only fund if in Canada, they accept cash deposit and internet billing. Price has been steady at ~$90 all day though no panic selling.
LibertyBit.com
https://www.libertybit.com/funding various easy methods, new exchange in Canada that takes intl wires and shockingly Interac deposits (easily frauded).
Bitcoin China
https://btcchina.com/ fast growing exchange, you pay in with Alipay or Tenpay both Chinese methods that westerners can't use or figure out due to no translation. You can probably use Alipay if you find and exchanger to load it, they do exist. **Edit they now support Liberty Reserve deposit and withdrawal
Check english forums to see if anybody exchanging Alipay or taking wires.
CampBX.com
Accepts money orders, and CapitalOne P2P payments. Also accepts Dwolla but you need to be verified.
Bitcoin-central.net
Just had a major outage due to instawallet hack, appears to be back online. You get your own quasi-bank account when you verify here much like how ecardone.com (liberty reserve) does banking so can transfer to other users legally with vouchers. You can buy a voucher p2p on Bitcointalk forums or IRC or send a bankwire.
VirWoX.com
You can pay with Paypal to get Second Life "Linden Dollars" then convert to BTC, or at least you used to be able to. I have no idea if this is still the case I've never used them.
Or course there's all the fixed price exchangers
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Trade and https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?board=53.0 for everything from Moneypak to Skrill. You can also risk buying coins on Silk Road with moneypak
==============R U L E S ================================
Enjoy buying all the way down the crash once Gox comes back online and the great sell off begins! Hold them for a year and they'll be worth 10x as much just like the 2011 crash. Bonus points if you speculate on Litecoin, rumor has it Gox will be trading them when they come back online but again, this is MtGox we are talking about so the site could implode on the zerg rush of people trying to get into their accounts or trading engine could sell all your coins for $0.0001 again like they did in 2011.
Great successez!
submitted by Derpcoin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Cult of Turtle - 38 lessons for safe Bitcoin trading from #bitcoin-otc IRC

intro

#bitcoin-otc is a trading channel on the Freenode IRC server that has existed since 2011 and is still around today. It's been a well known hub among Bitcoin traders, buyers and sellers and the chatroom has helped facilitate tens of thousands of trades across its lifespan.
Across its lengthy existence, many important lessons in safe trading have been learned by its members. One of its members has compiled a great deal of wealth into a document known as "Cult of Turtle", which contains 38 of the most valuable tips you could keep in mind when trading.
The list has been around for years now, and has been proven time and time again to be extremely accurate. (and tounge-in-cheek partly)
I've left all of the tips and original phrasing to preserve the original feeling of the guide - but for Reddit's benefit, I've highlighted the most relevant ones that are also extremely applicable when trading on Reddit or elsewhere. (and omitted several less relevant ones)
Hopefully this wealth of knowledge will help improve your resiliency to scams and scammers. :)

Cult of Turtle - 38 lessons for safe Bitcoin trading from #bitcoin-otc IRC

2. Never trade with someone who doesn’t have a long and good AND RECENT trade history (check ;;gettrust, ;;events).
5. Never lend bitcoins. you will probably never see them again. As Coolio- used to say “Loans are a gift”.
8. Don’t talk about your money, worth, or wealth
9. Don’t leave large sums in shared or online wallets (or other online games or services)
11. If someone is scammer tagged, don’t give them the benefit of the doubt. it might feel weird to consider someone guilty until proven innocent, but it will save your coins.
12. High yield investment programs (HYIP) or loans are pretty much always scams. think about it. if it sounds too good to be true…
13. Never let someone control your computer (teamviewer scams). Don’t install anything suspicious on your computer (trojans, viruses). Ideally have a clean dedicated computer for your transactions. Wipe that computer regularly.
14. There are no tricks to avoid chargebacks on paypal, credit cards, moneypak, dwolla, banks, etc. some services might be harder to chargeback, but nothing is immune.
15. People with good reps can turn bad or get in a bad spot. having a good rep does not mean they will never scam.
16. Break up large transactions into smaller ones, preferably with multiple people
18. Don’t trust someone who can’t speak proper English or your language of choice. this may sound classist, but your money is on the line; trade with professionals or reputable people
22. Don’t trust fast talkers, sweet talkers, smooth talkers. don’t be swayed by emotion or inability to think. a good deal is rarely time sensitive.
23. If someone gets agitated when you ask questions, they were probably trying to scam you
25. Many people offer escrow. use it. BUT ONLY IF YOU TRUST THE PERSON OFFERING ESCROW.
27. Don’t trust gamblers, addicts, or people who are constantly broke
30. Someone buying just to build ratings is suspicious. this goes for the OTC, btcjam, or anywhere else. beware.
31. Don’t use paypal. come on. people tell you this all the time. and for a reason. it’s easy to get scammed by people using paypal. and it’s easy for paypal to freeze your assets and hold your money for 180 days. [same applies for ebay]
32. You will eventually hear someone say “come on, it’s not like I’m going to scam someone for just $___”. yes. someone would scam for that amount. don’t fall for it
34. People with non-random X ending their name are highly likely to be a scammer have you ever noticed that everyone with names ending in a random x is highly likely to be a scammer? freefox <– non-random thetruthx <— random also, framing x’s are not so random xFBASTAGEx <– not so random
35. Unsolicited messages/spam/requests to trade are almost always scams.
36. Trust your gut. if someone gives you a bad vibe, there’s probably a reason. be safe rather than sorry
38. Nobody listens to turtle
You can find the full source on one of the mirrors: http://pi.littlebird-design.com/bitcoin/cult-of-turtle/ (or http://www.cultofturtle.com but seems like that ones hosting expired)
Which tips from this list are your favourite, have helped you prevent scams, or are completely new to you? Comment below and share your insight with others. :)
Cheers!
submitted by homm88 to RedditTradingTalk [link] [comments]

[PSA] Common Trade Scams and How to Avoid Them

This is a cross-post from /tf2trade after I requested someone revise our old guide on trade scams and how to avoid them. Many thanks to mostlylurkingmostly for assembling it.
/SGS guide on avoiding scams available here.
List as of 22nd of September 2013.
1. The fake link/phishing scam
One of the most common scam nowadays. This is a phishing technique used by many, especially on TF2Outpost. Phishing links are websites that trick you into giving them your account details (Steam username, password, e-mail username, e-mail password). After you gave your account details away, the phisher would change the email account tied to your steam account as well as the password, after moving your items and Steam wallet to one of his accounts.
Avoiding them : Be vigilant whenever you're clicking on a link. Make sure what you're clicking on is spelled correctly. Also, dmn002 wrote a chrome extension to block misspelled websites. Do check it out!
2. Taking the items and leave scam ...- thecommieduck
This scam involves someone asking to purchase an item of yours with something that they never intended to pay but they dazzle the person with the ease/value of the transaction. This is also sometimes accompanied by a fake Sourceop link for rep to show they're good-- never trust links the other person gives you. After receiving the item, they'll delete you. Your item would not be given back to you after the trade is done. This also applies to game codes.
Avoiding them: Steam > Settings > Interface > Display steam URL address bar when available. When someone adds you and say that they'll pay your buyout, copy and paste their steam url to www.steamrep.com After making sure that they have no scammer tags, find a middleman to help you with the trade. Be sure to check the "Search Steamrep Forums" button. (In red here). Even if the person is not tagged yet, they may still have pending reports of them as a scammer.
3. The Impersonation scam
Impersonators will copy a trusted trader's or one of your friend's profile down to the last detail and approach you saying they are interested in buying or borrowing something from you. They will claim to have a lot of REP so that you should go first in the trade. After you have given them the items, he would delete you and your item will never be seen again. Common targets for impersonation are the people from the SourceOP Trusted Seller group. A good way to check is the level of English they use. All of them are fluent in English, so they are unlikely to be incoherent in what they say. Also most of them are more mature traders, and are less likely to try and push you into a deal like an impetuous 5 year old.
P.S. -- Valve would most probably not return your item back to you.
Avoiding them:
Steam > Settings > Interface > Display steam URL address bar when available. When someone adds you and say that they'll pay your buyout, copy and paste their steam url to www.steamrep.com After making sure that they have no scammer tags, find a middleman to help you with the trade. Also, it's really important to search steamrep forums' to be sure that there are no scam reports pending for the person.
Always double check before a transaction. Some of the most heartbreaking scams have been because of impersonating friends' profiles.
4. Fake middleman scam
Fake middleman scam is similar to the impersonator scam. The scam would involve 3 people - Victim, 'Fake middleman', and the 'accomplice'. The accomplice would approach you, asking to pay the buyout of your item(s). You checked his profile/backpack/SteamRep and everything seems okay. They would suggest a middleman and you would agree to it. Suddenly, the 'fake middleman' joins the chat and shows you his Steamrep/SourceOP/Dota2Traders page and you would think that he's legit. After giving him your items, they would both delete and block you, never to be seen again.
Avoiding them: Do not rush into trades. Make sure that the middleman is legit by clicking their portrait in the group chat window and visiting their Steam page, then cross-referencing it with SteamRep. Common sign/s are - Private profile/backpack.
5. Swap/QuickSwitch Scam
This scam involves the victim thinking they're getting one item but got another instead. Here's what happens: Someone would add you and said that he'll be willing to do a trade. He'll then put up X and you'll put up the items you're paying for it. Without you noticing, he'll quickly switch it to another item of less value. The item might also be renamed to suit X so that you wouldn't notice anything amiss in the chat window of the trade. After trading, he will get away with your items.
Quickswitch scams are quite common among low-grade scammers. It also involves misdirection -- they'll ask you a question in Steam chat so you switch windows, they'll swap the item while you're typing, then ask you to add another item or remove one of them. Then you both approve the trade. QuickSwitch has become more of a "ConmanSwitch" than something done only in rushed trades.
Avoiding them: Always make sure that the items for the trade are the items you agreed on. Do not click ready until you make sure the trade is good to go.
6. Charge back scam
This scam involves someone charging back the amount of money he sent you after receiving the item. The scammer sends funds over Paypal or a similar service, then, after receiving the item from you, contacts his/her bank to protest the transaction. The money returns to the scammer and they get away with the item.
Avoiding them: Make sure the person you're trading with has enough rep and is trustworthy. Avoid too good to be true deals and selling big stuff all at once, like hooks, timebreakers, and unusuals unless they're to a trustworthy person. Moneypak and BitCoin are non-refundable, but require more effort on the buyer's side.
For Chargeback scams, we should also recommend that (for maximum risk avoidance) that the buyer's cash rep should extend much far beyond 90 days in the past. In an ideal world, you are never selling to someone with lots of cash rep that only goes 90 days back (the most common chargeback window for PayPal purchases). As a rule of thumb selling anything major, ignore any cash rep in the last 90 days and your ideal scenario is that their older cash rep should definitely total more than what the current transaction is. That way you have a sign that they are invested in their rep and aren't gaining more by charging back than they are giving up in historical reputation they've built up.
7. Delayed Payment Scam - thecommieduck
This scam involves someone asking you to give/borrow him an item or two for a short period of time. After you've given him the item, he'll delete you with your items.
Avoiding them: Never lend an item you aren't willing to lose to find out if your friend is a traitor.
8. Fake profile rep
Whenever you're doing a high-value/ cash trades, please be aware that Steam profile rep can easily be faked. Never trust the amount of profile rep one has when doing such trades. Comments can be deleted by the owner of the profile, so negative rep will always be lost.
9. Two-man (tag team) scam
There are a couple of variations on this tricky scam. In the first variation, a person adds you. He says he wants to buy an item for a high price (more than the usual price). A second person gets in contact to say they are selling the very same item that person one wants to buy. So you buy it from person 2 at the price they ask for, then both people delete you and you're stuck with an item you didn't want to begin with.
In the second variation, person A says he has the new pudge hair. When you add him he says his brother works at Valve and got a bunch of promo codes that will activate the pudge hair. He then all of a sudden add another person (B) in to the chat. Person B says he wants the pudge hair and person A says "it is a code" and person B will be say "hey, it's okay, I want the code, I will trade you so and so." You now get nervous and think you might miss the deal and you will outbid him. You trade him the item and he removes you.
Avoiding the scam: Never, ever rush trades. If it's too good to be true, it is. Always take your time and this scam will not happen. Also, trading for codes is dangerous.
10. Fake items/nametag scam
This scam relies on the trader's inability to distinguish between a real item and a faked item with a name tag or description tag. Simply put, the scammer renames and describes an item similar to the one you think you are trading for. If you do not notice the difference, you trade for the fraudulent item and lose in the trade.
Avoiding the scam: Check the item in the trade window multiple times to make sure. It will say whether the item was renamed or not. Also check the match ID if it is a faked tournament item.
11. Trade offeSteam Wallet scam
This scam revolves around the Steam Trade Offers feature, and plays on an old scam at the same time. The scammer sends you a trade offer for your items, offering nothing in return, and types in the message box that they are offering you Steam Wallet. You accept the offer and they never send the Steam Wallet, so you lose your items.
Avoiding the scam: NEVER accept Steam Trade Offers where you receive nothing, unless you are certain that this is correct. Also, you will never receive any messages saying that someone is offering you Steam Wallet.
12. E-mail confirmation scam
The scammer sends you an offer for an item, then requests that you forward the e-mail from Steam asking for confirmation of the trade to the scammer. Do not do this, because the link in the e-mail is not tied to IP or e-mail, and can be verified from any location. You will lose your item this way.
Read more here: https://redd.it/3i41ky
Thanks to - thecommieduck, thorax, cdxliv, neocow, anonymousdeity, EXAX, mostlylurkingmostly, Rhys13th and others.
submitted by musical_hog to Dota2Trade [link] [comments]

Common trade scams and how to avoid them V2

Common Trade Scams and How to Avoid Them
/SGS guide on avoiding scams
List as of 8th of August 2013.
1. The fake link scam
One of the most common scam nowadays. This is a phishing technique used by many, especially on outpost. Phishing links are websites that trick you into giving them your account details (Steam username, password, Email username, email password). After you gave your account details away, the phisher would change the email account tied to your steam account as well as the password of it after moving your items and steam wallet to one of his accounts.
Avoiding them : Be vigilant whenever you're clicking on a link. Make sure what you're clicking at is spelled correctly. Also, dmn002 wrote a chrome extension to block misspelled websites. Do check it out!
2. Taking the items and leave scam.
This scam involves someone asking to purchase an item of yours with something that they never intended to pay but they dazzle the person with the ease/value of the transaction. This is also sometimes accompanied by a fake sourceop link for rep to show they're good-- never trust links the other person gives you. After receiving the item, they'll delete you. Your item would not be given back to you after the trade is done. This also applies to game codes.
Avoiding them: Steam > Settings > Interface > Display steam URL address bar when available. When someone adds you and say that they'll pay your buyout, copy and paste their steam url to www.steamrep.com After making sure that they have no scammer tags, find a middleman to help you with the trade. Be sure to check the "Search Steamrep Forums" button. (In red here and here. Even if the person is not tagged yet, they may still have pending reports of them as a scammer.
3.The Impersonation scam
Impersonators will copy a trusted traders/ one of your friend's profile down to the last detail and approach you saying they are interested in buying something from you. They will claim to have a lot of REP so that you should go first in the trade. After you have given them the items, he would delete you and your item will never be seen again. Common targets for impersonation are the people from the SourceOP Trusted Seller group. A good way to check is the level of English they use. All of them are fluent in English, so they are unlikely to be incoherent in what they say. Also most of them are more mature traders, and are less likely to try and push you into a deal like an impetutous 5 year old.
P.S. Valve would most probably not return your item back to you.
Avoiding them:
Steam > Settings > Interface > Display steam URL address bar when available. When someone adds you and say that they'll pay your buyout, copy and paste their steam url to www.steamrep.com After making sure that they have no scammer tags, find a middleman to help you with the trade. Also, it's really important to search steamrep forums' to be sure that there are no scam reports pending for the person.
Always doublecheck before a transaction. Some of the most heartbreaking scams have been because of impersonating friends' profiles.
4.Fake middleman scam
Fake middleman scam is similar to the impersonator scam. The scam would involve 3 people - Victim, 'Fake middleman', and the 'accomplice'. The accomplice would approach you, asking to pay the buyout of _____. You checked his profile/backpack/steam rep and everything seems okay. They would suggest a middleman and you would agree to it. Suddenly, the 'fake middleman' joins the chat and shows you his steamrep/sourceop page and you would think that he's legit. After giving him your items, they would both delete and block you, never to be seen again.
Avoiding them: Do not rush into trades. Make sure that the middleman is legit and not impersonating any other admins. Common sign/s are - Private profile/backpack
5: Swap/QuickSwitch Scam
This scam involves the victim thinking they're getting one item but got another instead. Here's what happens: Someone would add you and said that he'll be willing to do a trade. He'll then put up X and you'll put up the items you're paying for it. Without you noticing, he'll quickly switch it to another item of less value. The item might also be renamed to suit X so that you wouldn't anything amiss in the chat window of the trade. After trading, he will get away with your items.
For QuickSwitch, it is massively common nowadays. It also involves misdirection-- they'll ask you a question in Steam chat so you switch windows, they'll swap the item while you're typing, then ask you to add another item or remove one of them. Then you both approve the trade. QuickSwitch has become more of a "ConmanSwitch" than something done only in rushed trades.
Avoiding them: Always make sure that the items for the trade are the items you agreed on. Do not click ready until you make sure the trade is good to go.
6.Charge back scam
This scam involves someone charging back the amount of money he sent you after receiving the item. You would lose both the money and the items when charge backed.
Avoiding them: Make sure the person you're trading with have enough rep and is trustable. Avoid too good to be true deals and selling big stuff all at once, like buds and unusuals unless they're to a trustable person. Try moneypak/bitcoin as they are both non-refundable.
For Chargeback scams, we should also recommend that (for maximum risk avoidance) that the buyer's cash rep should extend much far beyond 90 days in the past. In an ideal world, you are never selling to someone with lots of cash rep that only goes 90 days back (the most common chargeback window for PayPal purchases). As a rule of thumb selling anything major, ignore any cash rep in the last 90 days and your ideal scenario is that their older cash rep should definitely total more than what the current transaction is. That way you have a sign that they are invested in their rep and aren't gaining more by charging back than they are giving up in historical reputation they've built up.
7. Delayed Payment Scam
This scam involves someone asking you to give/borrow him an item or two for a short period of time. After you've given him the item, he'll delete you with your items.
Avoiding them: Never lend an item you aren't willing to lose to find out if your friend is a traitor.
8. Fake profile rep
Whenever you're doing a high-value/ cash trades, please make sure that steam's profile rep can easily be faked. Never trust the amount of profile rep one has when doing such trades.
9. Spycrab and Gambling scams
When spycrabbing, both parties would be betting particular items from their backpack. After losing, some of them would leave the server immediately, in hopes of not giving the item to the winner. This also applies to making bets.
Avoiding them - Use a trusted middleman to transfer the items before the match.
10.The bait
This scam involves 3 people. Victim, seller, and accomplice. Let's say you have item X. You received a random add saying they would like to trade X for their Y. Shortly after, you received another add. This person asked to buy Y with Z (Something worth more then your item) this would make you do the trade to get Y. After getting Y, they'll both remove you and you're stuck with it.
Avoiding them - Always check if both the person selling and buying are not friends
Always listen to people when they talk about their scam attempts, you never know when you'll be targeted
http://www.enhancedsteam.com/ Good for seeing prices/deals, AND there are links on everybody's page (in your browser only) for their SteamRep and more.
Thanks for reading! Sorry for some grammar mistakes here and there, my english isn't that good. Please comment below if I missed out anything!
Thanks to - thecommieduck, thorax, cdxliv, neocow, anonymousdeity, EXAX, mostlylurkingmostly, Rhys13th, Epicbroccoli, genemilder, leuphewaffle, genemilder and others.
submitted by MagneticSe7en to tf2trade [link] [comments]

NEW TRADERS READ HERE TO AVOID BEING SCAMMED

Due to an influx of new traders from TI4 getting scammed with injection and fake MM scams, we've stickied Hammy's guide on trade scams. If you are a new trader please look over these scams, if you are selling for paypal/WU or any other non-Steam supported method please pay careful attention to the middleman injection and impersonator sections.
READ BEFORE DOING REAL MONEY TRADES
  1. You should be in a multi-user chat when someone is middlemaning your trade.
  2. From your multi-user chat you can check all parties involved for legitimacy (always do this before trading).
  3. Start by going from the chat into the buyeMM profile like this: http://i.imgur.com/QtD4qAD.png
  4. Copy the url from the user (in this example the buyer): http://i.imgur.com/EInGsEk.jpg
  5. Go to steamrep.com and paste the user url into the search box.
  6. On the page check for pending reports and use other search functions to look for scam reports: http://i.imgur.com/vUMFk4D.png
  7. Using the same method check to ensure your middleman is official: http://i.imgur.com/yGgHfCm.png
  8. If everything checks out it is safe to go forward with the trade. If anyone leaves the multi-person chat be sure to check them again if they come back in.
  9. Remember to check as many times as you feel necessary, we are very patient when it comes to ensuring the safety of both the buyer and seller.
  10. A reminder to never trade with anyone marked with a SR scammer tag, such as this piece of human shit: http://i.imgur.com/tSyyZ6M.png
This is a cross-post from /tf2trade after I requested someone revise our old guide on trade scams and how to avoid them. Many thanks to mostlylurkingmostly for assembling it.
/SGS guide on avoiding scams available here.
List as of 22nd of September 2013.
1. Fake middleman scam
Fake middleman scam is similar to the impersonator scam. The scam would involve 3 people - Victim, 'Fake middleman', and the 'accomplice'. The accomplice would approach you, asking to pay the buyout of your item(s). You checked his profile/backpack/SteamRep and everything seems okay. They would suggest a middleman and you would agree to it. Suddenly, the 'fake middleman' joins the chat and shows you his Steamrep/SourceOP/Dota2Traders page and you would think that he's legit. After giving him your items, they would both delete and block you, never to be seen again.
Note: Anytime someone asks to use a friend from your friendslist who is not an official MM they are either attempting to scam you or your friend. Always decline their offer and insist on an official MM.
Avoiding them: Do not rush into trades. Make sure that the middleman is legit by clicking their portrait in the group chat window and visiting their Steam page, then cross-referencing it with SteamRep. Common sign/s are - Private profile/backpack.
2. The Impersonation scam
Impersonators will copy a trusted trader's or one of your friend's profile down to the last detail and approach you saying they are interested in buying or borrowing something from you. They will claim to have a lot of REP so that you should go first in the trade. After you have given them the items, he would delete you and your item will never be seen again. Common targets for impersonation are the people from the SourceOP Trusted Seller group. A good way to check is the level of English they use. All of them are fluent in English, so they are unlikely to be incoherent in what they say. Also most of them are more mature traders, and are less likely to try and push you into a deal like an impetuous 5 year old.
P.S. -- Valve would most probably not return your item back to you.
Avoiding them:
Steam > Settings > Interface > Display steam URL address bar when available. When someone adds you and say that they'll pay your buyout, copy and paste their steam url to www.steamrep.com After making sure that they have no scammer tags, find a middleman to help you with the trade. Also, it's really important to search steamrep forums' to be sure that there are no scam reports pending for the person.
Always double check before a transaction. Some of the most heartbreaking scams have been because of impersonating friends' profiles.
3. Taking the items and leave scam ...- thecommieduck
This scam involves someone asking to purchase an item of yours with something that they never intended to pay but they dazzle the person with the ease/value of the transaction. This is also sometimes accompanied by a fake Sourceop link for rep to show they're good-- never trust links the other person gives you. After receiving the item, they'll delete you. Your item would not be given back to you after the trade is done. This also applies to game codes.
Avoiding them: Steam > Settings > Interface > Display steam URL address bar when available. When someone adds you and say that they'll pay your buyout, copy and paste their steam url to www.steamrep.com After making sure that they have no scammer tags, find a middleman to help you with the trade. Be sure to check the "Search Steamrep Forums" button. (In red here). Even if the person is not tagged yet, they may still have pending reports of them as a scammer.
4. The fake link/phishing scam
One of the most common scam nowadays. This is a phishing technique used by many, especially on TF2Outpost. Phishing links are websites that trick you into giving them your account details (Steam username, password, e-mail username, e-mail password). After you gave your account details away, the phisher would change the email account tied to your steam account as well as the password, after moving your items and Steam wallet to one of his accounts.
Avoiding them : Be vigilant whenever you're clicking on a link. Make sure what you're clicking on is spelled correctly. Also, dmn002 wrote a chrome extension to block misspelled websites. Do check it out!
5. Swap/QuickSwitch Scam
This scam involves the victim thinking they're getting one item but got another instead. Here's what happens: Someone would add you and said that he'll be willing to do a trade. He'll then put up X and you'll put up the items you're paying for it. Without you noticing, he'll quickly switch it to another item of less value. The item might also be renamed to suit X so that you wouldn't notice anything amiss in the chat window of the trade. After trading, he will get away with your items.
Quickswitch scams are quite common among low-grade scammers. It also involves misdirection -- they'll ask you a question in Steam chat so you switch windows, they'll swap the item while you're typing, then ask you to add another item or remove one of them. Then you both approve the trade. QuickSwitch has become more of a "ConmanSwitch" than something done only in rushed trades.
Avoiding them: Always make sure that the items for the trade are the items you agreed on. Do not click ready until you make sure the trade is good to go.
6. Charge back scam
This scam involves someone charging back the amount of money he sent you after receiving the item. The scammer sends funds over Paypal or a similar service, then, after receiving the item from you, contacts his/her bank to protest the transaction. The money returns to the scammer and they get away with the item.
Avoiding them: Make sure the person you're trading with has enough rep and is trustworthy. Avoid too good to be true deals and selling big stuff all at once, like hooks, timebreakers, and unusuals unless they're to a trustworthy person. Moneypak and BitCoin are non-refundable, but require more effort on the buyer's side.
For Chargeback scams, we should also recommend that (for maximum risk avoidance) that the buyer's cash rep should extend much far beyond 90 days in the past. In an ideal world, you are never selling to someone with lots of cash rep that only goes 90 days back (the most common chargeback window for PayPal purchases). As a rule of thumb selling anything major, ignore any cash rep in the last 90 days and your ideal scenario is that their older cash rep should definitely total more than what the current transaction is. That way you have a sign that they are invested in their rep and aren't gaining more by charging back than they are giving up in historical reputation they've built up.
7. Delayed Payment Scam - thecommieduck
This scam involves someone asking you to give/borrow him an item or two for a short period of time. After you've given him the item, he'll delete you with your items.
Avoiding them: Never lend an item you aren't willing to lose to find out if your friend is a traitor.
8. Fake profile rep
Whenever you're doing a high-value/ cash trades, please be aware that Steam profile rep can easily be faked. Never trust the amount of profile rep one has when doing such trades. Comments can be deleted by the owner of the profile, so negative rep will always be lost.
9. Two-man (tag team) scam
There are a couple of variations on this tricky scam. In the first variation, a person adds you. He says he wants to buy an item for a high price (more than the usual price). A second person gets in contact to say they are selling the very same item that person one wants to buy. So you buy it from person 2 at the price they ask for, then both people delete you and you're stuck with an item you didn't want to begin with.
In the second variation, person A says he has the new pudge hair. When you add him he says his brother works at Valve and got a bunch of promo codes that will activate the pudge hair. He then all of a sudden add another person (B) in to the chat. Person B says he wants the pudge hair and person A says "it is a code" and person B will be say "hey, it's okay, I want the code, I will trade you so and so." You now get nervous and think you might miss the deal and you will outbid him. You trade him the item and he removes you.
Avoiding the scam: Never, ever rush trades. If it's too good to be true, it is. Always take your time and this scam will not happen. Also, trading for codes is dangerous.
10. Fake items/nametag scam
This scam relies on the trader's inability to distinguish between a real item and a faked item with a name tag or description tag. Simply put, the scammer renames and describes an item similar to the one you think you are trading for. If you do not notice the difference, you trade for the fraudulent item and lose in the trade.
Avoiding the scam: Check the item in the trade window multiple times to make sure. It will say whether the item was renamed or not. Also check the match ID if it is a faked tournament item.
11. Trade offeSteam Wallet scam
This scam revolves around the Steam Trade Offers feature, and plays on an old scam at the same time. The scammer sends you a trade offer for your items, offering nothing in return, and types in the message box that they are offering you Steam Wallet. You accept the offer and they never send the Steam Wallet, so you lose your items.
Avoiding the scam: NEVER accept Steam Trade Offers where you receive nothing, unless you are certain that this is correct. Also, you will never receive any messages saying that someone is offering you Steam Wallet.
Thanks to - thecommieduck, thorax, cdxliv, neocow, anonymousdeity, EXAX, mostlylurkingmostly, Rhys13th and others.
submitted by Eternal_Mr_Bones to Dota2Trade [link] [comments]

Sell items for money safely with our automated middleman

You can buy and sell TF2 (Team Fortress 2) items with other people with our bot to hold the items, and Mtgox as the payment processor.
Why should you use this?
How it works
Is it safe?
We have already tested multiple trades with several people already, but no one can guarantee any system is completely safe. Identities are managed by Steam, so we do not record your passwords. All transactions are logged. We already had a working version back in October, but we decided to test it some more before releasing it to the general public.
It is always possible for Valve to clawback any items, especially if the items were gained by a credit-card chargeback. This is a fundamental problem for Steam, not an inherent problem in our system.
Can I sell anything else besides TF2 items?
Currently no. It is against the terms of agreement to sell Spiral Knights items, and there is a Valve support page that says you are not allowed to sell Steam gifts for money. We also do not have Portal 2.
Links
submitted by killblob to tf2trade [link] [comments]

[PSA] Updated real-world currency trading guide!

In this guide, we will discuss the most current safe methods by which to convert your Dota 2 (or any Steam-tradable) items for cash over Paypal, Western Union, Bank Transfer, or Bitcoin.
I will assume you know how to find a buyeseller and list your items. That information should be obvious, if you're using this community. I will also assume you have set up a Paypal account. Verify it!
Full disclosure: selling items for cash over Paypal is never 100% safe. Chargebacks can and do happen, even with users who have a lot of rep. The best you can do is minimize your risk by following these steps OR using alternate cash transfer methods, such as the ones outlined above.
Step One: Rep rep rep!
When selling or buying an item over Paypal, the #1 most important thing is reputation. Without it, you will have a hard time buying items of significant value because it's unclear whether you can be trusted not to incur a chargeback. It's also important as a seller because you will attract more business if you have a lot of +rep.
It is highly encouraged to check if your buyer's Paypal account is verified. Follow these steps!*
Checking a user's SteamRep report should always be your first step when determining whether someone is reputable or not. SteamRep is a scam/fraud report database, wherein users submit proof that another user is a scammer or has otherwise engaged in fraudulent activity. Under no circumstances should you trade with a marked scammer because you are putting yourself at significant risk to get the scammer tag passed on to you. The reason for this is that if you knowingly trade with a scammer, you are passively (or actively) encouraging that behavior, effectively making you accessory to the offense.
Special note: You may see some "pending reports" against a user. Usually, if these reports are compelling enough, you should avoid trading with that person and/or be very careful.
Reputation threads are used to keep track of purchases/sales made over Paypal and other real-world currency protocols, and it's highly encouraged to set one up. There are only two websites that house rep threads that I recognize as legitimate (though more may exist):
When examining someone's rep thread, you need to take into account the following things:
  1. How old is the thread? If it's brand new, that may be a warning sign. If it's months or years old, that's probably a good sign. Paypal recently changed their policy regarding chargebacks, so it's best to look for threads with Paypal rep older than 180 days, which is now the available window for chargebacks.
  2. How many +reps does this person have? If only just a few, I would avoid doing a large transaction with them. If there is any -rep, read it carefully and determine if it's worth the risk!
  3. Is the person you're talking to really the person in the rep thread? Double check by asking them to PM you from that forum account with a secret phrase! I've been impersonated about a dozen times by people who link to my rep thread with a spoof account on Steam. Be careful!
If the person's rep checks out with you, move forward. If not, walk away! You have no reason to feel guilty about saying no.
In the event someone doesn't have a rep thread, but you want to work with them anyway, look at their Steam profile. Consider the following things:
Step Two: Finding a middleman
The use of a middleman when dealing with real-world currency transactions is imperative. It significantly reduces the risk for both parties, since neither will have to "go first" when trading. There are many great and trustworthy individuals who offer their services for free, but some may charge a small fee. Tipping is entirely optional, but it is considered customary to tip the middleman for his time and service. Tipping should be relative to the size of the transaction, but it's ultimately up to you.
  • Some /dota2trade moderators are active middlemen and will respond to your request for help via modmail. Message us here if you need someone! I have middlemanned for tens of thousands of dollars just myself.
  • SteamRep middlemen are community admins who represent their respective communities, but will usually middleman for just about anything.
  • Dota2Traders also has a list of middlemen.
If you can't find one, wait until you can! Do not rush a deal, or you might end up getting scammed, and there's nothing anyone can do about it at that point. Steam support has zero pity for items lost to most scams these days, especially if it's heavily implied that you were selling for cash.
Step Three: Completing the transaction!
Once you have found a middleman and all parties are online, determine the method of payment you would like to use. Consider the pros and cons of each.
  • Paypal transactions are the quickest, easiest, and usually incur the lowest fees. However, it is the least secure, and chargebacks are easy to issue. Chargebacks almost always fall in favor of the scammer (99.5%).
  • Western Union transactions have higher fees, but are almost completely safe for the seller. Please read up on the Western Union process for sending money there. Typically, this process will take more time than Paypal, up to more than one business day. If there is a dispute about whether the money was sent or received, both parties must provide substantial evidence to support their claim.
  • Bank transfers operate in much the same way as a Western Union transaction would. In this case, the buyer must receive some personal information from the seller in order to send the money. Please read more about the process.
  • Bitcoin transactions are a little complicated, but there are middlemen who know how to determine by examining a blockchain whether the coins were sent properly, so it's very hard to scam and be scammed using bitcoin.)
Once the details have been figured out, the transaction should go as follows:
  1. Group chat is opened with all parties involved.
  2. Check everyone's profiles to make sure that there are no impersonators or fake middlemen.
  3. Seller then sends the items to the middleman. Beware the middleman injection scam! Check the person you're trading with before accepting.
  4. Buyer then sends the agreed upon amount of funds to the seller over the preferred medium. See sub points below for further clarification. Please note that Skype screen share may be required for some of these:
  5. Seller confirms that the cash has arrived as expected. If there is a dispute about the amount, fees, or whether the payment has arrived, the middleman holds the items until a resolution has been reached. Concrete evidence is required from both parties to determine who is telling the truth, or if there is a rare glitch in the system.
  6. Middleman then sends the items to the buyer.
  7. Exchange +rep on rep threads and/or profiles and/or reddit threads.
  8. Tipping is customary and to stiff your middleman is considered very rude. These people volunteer their time and efforts to ensure you trade as safely as possible.
It is at this point that you may all part ways with the transaction complete.
I excluded Moneypak from this document revision because it is more difficult than it is worth. I recently went through a transaction wherein the seller accidentally requested a refund and we had to wait nearly two weeks for the check to arrive before I could send the item to the buyer. Nobody was happy about that.
If you have suggestions, please include them and I will edit them in.
submitted by musical_hog to Dota2Trade [link] [comments]

Want to buy bitcoins, don't want to use localbitcoins

I want to buy bitcoins using cash deposit or moneypak, but all of the listings on localbitcoins are priced very highly. Is there any other options out there?
submitted by Badass_moose to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

[PSA] Common scams & how to avoid them guide.

Wiki Page
How to look up a user safely and check if they're a scammer:
If the person is messaging you on Steam, click their user picture in the chat window to go to their Steam profile. Right click that page and choose "Copy Page URL" to make sure you have their real Steam profile page. If the person is messaging you on another website, there should be direct (not typed by the user) links to their Steam profile page. From there you can copy the URL from the address bar in your browser.
Then go to SteamRep and paste that copied link into the search bar to bring up their user page. If a user has been marked as a scammer or caution (on a SR member community) it will be listed on this page. It's possible that a user has pending scam reports against them but are not yet marked. To look these up, click the "Search SteamRep Forum" link in the "Search Engine Queries" section on the user's page. Each SR user page also has user-specific links to multiple trading and rep sites, use these rather than trusting any links given to you by a user (see #1).
Other things that indicate a probable scammer or scammer alt account are low games playtime, low backpack value (when buying expensive items), few other games on Steam, private account, and low account age (which shows on their SR page). A lack of fluency in English is also a possible warning sign, but shouldn't be used as a sole reason not to trust someone.

Common Scams

  1. Fake Phishing Links One of the most common scams, this is a technique used by many, even outside of the game. Phishing links look like links to familiar websites, but are actually imitation websites that try to trick you into giving them your account details (Steam and/or email username and password) or download malware that will take your details/control of your computer. With these details the phisher can gain control of the account and lock you out of it by changing account details, then move your items and steam wallet funds to one of the phisher's accounts. Phishers can contact you through Steam, trade sites, and even email so always be careful to check before you click links. Even better is to not click links at all, and navigate to the real page yourself by searching (see top for details). Additionally, a chrome extension written by dmn002 will block several known misspelled websites, but it won't stop all of them. For Firefox users, Jeesecar96 made a userscript to block phishing sites.
  2. Quickswitching This involves the victim thinking they're getting one item but gets another instead. While in a trade, a scammer will put up the desired item. Without the victim noticing, he'll quickly switch it to another item of less value that looks similar. A common attempt is switching an expensive unusual hat with a much cheaper unusual version of that hat; the item will look the same in the trade window but have a different effect. The item might also be renamed so that chat window of the trade that updates when items are removed/added looks less suspicious. After trading, the victim is left with the switched item. This scam often involves misdirection; they'll ask a question in Steam chat so the victim switches windows and then the scammer will swap the item while the victim is typing. They might also ask the victim to add another item or remove one of them, or add and remove many items themselves to mask the visible chatlog from showing that they've switched the item. With updates to Steam trading this has become easier to notice. Any change in items is shown in the trade chatlog and any change after you have readied up on the trade will stop you from accepting the trade. Always take your time in trades, and double check all items after you have clicked "ready".
  3. Bait and Switch 2 complicit scammers go on a trade server, a trade site, or possibly contact people directly. The first advertises that they are paying a very high amount for a specific item (usually rare but not a requirement), a lot more than it is actually worth. The second advertises selling that exact item, for more than it is worth but for less than the other scammer is offering. They pretend to be unaware of each other, hoping that someone gullible will try to make a quick profit by buying the overpriced item from the second scammer with the intent to sell to the first. Once the item has been sold to the victim for the inflated price the two scammers leave the server, close their listings, or block the victim, leaving the victim stuck with the item.
  4. Lending A scammer may ask to borrow a specific item for a short period of time (usually giving some flattering reason to the victim). After the item is given, it won't be returned. Scammers will take advantage of online acquaintances this way if given the chance. Never lend an item you aren't willing to lose to find out if your "friend" is a scammer.
  5. Trading Outside Steam A scammer may offer to purchase a victim's item with something that won't fit in the trade window (usually cash or game codes). They'll ask the victim to go first and claim that they'll give the payment separately after they have the item. Once they have the victim's item they'll simply block the victim. Many times the offer will be very high to attract victims with more greed than sense. If something seems too good to be true it likely is. This is also sometimes accompanied by a fake link (see #1) for rep to show why they deserve to go second in the trade; never trust links the other person gives you. Instead of a fake link, the scammer may impersonate a trusted trader in which case the links would be correct but not belong to the scammer's account. Looking up the potential scammer's info as detailed above (not using the links given to you) can make the impersonation obvious. Always double check before a transaction. There are legitimate transactions with legitimate traders that happen partially outside the trade window, but the possibility of being scammed is very high. SteamRep maintains a list of trusted middlemen, which act as a neutral party to hold the Steam-tradable side of payment while the rest is transferred. Even with a trusted middleman in a cash trade you can still be scammed (see #7), so be careful.
  6. Middleman Injection After a trade that takes place partially outside Steam has been agreed to, a middleman needs to be chosen. The scammer will suggest a trusted middleman that checks out correctly on SteamRep. However, once the victim agrees to the middleman a fake account pretending to be that middleman adds the victim. Once the unaware victim completes their side of the transaction, believing that they are using a trusted middleman, both the scammer and accomplice will delete and block them while keeping the stolen goods. Make sure you personally add the middleman yourself, and independently verify the identity of the person who added you using the instructions above (look up both accounts on SteamRep and compare). If you're not listed in the friends list of the actual trusted middleman, you're dealing with a scammer. You need to check the MM out yourself - that means you click on the MM's profile and copy/paste their profile URL into SteamRep and verify that it's the person they say they are.
  7. Chargebacks Funds sent over PayPal (and some other sites) can be "charged back", meaning that PayPal revokes the transaction and gives the buyer their money back. Scammers abuse this by making otherwise legitimate transactions then pulling their money back (sometimes months later) so that they get too keep both the items and the cash. To limit your risk of being charged back (if you use PayPal the risk will always be there), make sure the person buying from you has a long history of successful cash transactions without charge backs. Rep threads on SourceOP are trustworthy; to search for a user's rep thread navigate to their SteamRep page and click the "SOP" link in the "Search Engine Queries" section. Comments on one's Steam profile should not be considered rep as they are easily faked and any negative comments can be deleted by the user. It is recommended that (for maximum risk avoidance) that the buyer's cash rep (from a trusted source) should extend far beyond 90 days in the past. Ideally you should never sell to someone with lots of cash rep that only goes back 90 days or less because this is the most common charge back window for PayPal purchases. As a rule of thumb for selling anything of major value, ignore any cash rep made in the last 90 days and ideally their older cash rep should definitely total more than what the current transaction is. This indicates that they are invested in their rep and aren't gaining more by possibly choosing to charge back than they are giving up in historical reputation they've built up. MoneyPak and Bitcoin do not allow for charge backs, these are safer alternatives.
  8. Gambling Any betting or gambling game that relies on trust that the losing party will pay up has the possibility of that party simply choosing not to pay. This is considered scamming. To avoid this, use a trusted middleman to hold each party's items before the game begins. Because any middleman can theoretically scam you the same way once he has your items, be careful who to trust (see #5).
  9. Money Transfer within Steam Many times scammers will attempt to convince the victim that money can be sent directly over Steam, usually as part of some other trade. This is a variant of #5 which relies on the victim not being familiar with Steam Trade/Offers/Market. They may put something in the chat that appears to be an automated payment message or simply convince you that it will happen. The only way currently that money (as Steam wallet funds) can be transferred in Steam is through the Steam Community Market. It cannot be transferred as a result of a trade in Steam or through the Steam Offers interface. If you ever feel unsure about a trade, take a step back and research it. Valve puts out FAQs on all of their trading methods that are explicit about what is allowed and what is not.
  10. Email Verification Scam The scammer will as you to either forward the trade confirmation link, the trade decline link, or a screenshot of your email that contains these. Do not do so.
  11. False Trade Links on Profiles The scammer will have a Trade Link on his profile readily available, hoping that you will click on the link to offer your item for his. His main profile will contain the item you want, e.g. a Sapphire Flip Knife. You check his inventory and confirm that he has the knife you want, then you would click the trade link on his profile, which would lead to a profile that is completely identical to the profile with the sapphire, the only difference being that his Sapphire Flip Knife is now a Phase 4 Flip Knife. You, wanting to make $20+ Profit, will put his Phase 4 Flip Knife into the trade window, not noticing that the Flip Knife has changed from a Sapphire to a Phase 4. The same goes for different Float Values or conditions (He could have a Field-Tested Vulcan instead of the Factory New one you wanted from him) Always inspect the item you are trading for and double check the item description. Always be suspicious when you are making profit that you know you shouldn't be, sometimes it's a scam, sometimes it's legit. Be alert.
  12. Friend impersonation scam During trade negotiations, the scammer will agree to the trade only if you briefly give the item(s) to a person of your choice on your friends list, who would then return them to you so you could make the trade. Once you trade away the item, a steam account impersonating you will try to get the item(s) from your friend. This form of impersonation is especially effective because your friend has no reason to be suspicious and is likely not aware of common scams, and so more likely to fall for the act. If someone asks you to trade an item to a friend and back for any reason, it's almost certainly a scam attempt.
  13. Verify items scam The scammer will ask you to trade your items to an IRL friend your trust to "verify" the items or to prove that you are trustworthy. The scammer then copies your name and avatar and proceeds to invite your friend to trade and makes off with the items. Scammer's may also ask you to send your items to a "trustworthy middleman" for "inspection", but however trustworthy they may appear to be, they are in on the scam and out to steal your items.
  14. Glimmer Drop The user trades an item that appears to be worth a lot on the Steam Community Market, however the item is one of the few on the market and it's actual value is next to nothing. This is frequent amongst "autographed Dota items" which are unique and have never sold for large amount on the market. Another variant is the scammer tells you they will trade their high valued items or keys for an item on the steam community market and asks you to purchase it. This item is actually owned by the scammer's alt account, they then leave without fulfilling their end of the deal.
  15. Fake Gambling website scam A website that is seemingly authentic (usually the source code is taken directly from a legitimate/popular betting site) is set up to scam users in various ways. They may claim to an admin of the site and prove so by altering it (remember - it's a fake site) and make an agreement to rig a "bet" or "pot" and split the money with you, the scammer then takes your items either via the fake site's bot or a direct trade. Promises of guaranteed wins or a trades involving the fake site's currency may also be involved. Always verify any website someone links you. If it seems fishy avoid the user altogether.
  16. Fake bot / Impersonation of a gambling site bot Common with marketplaces such as OPSkins and gambling sites. Make sure the bot has the code which matches the one provided on the site itself. These scams may be random or targeted when a scammer is aware someone is about depost skins on to the site.
Variants of the above happen all the time, and new scams are always being thought up. Be careful! Never rush into trades, especially if they seem too good to be true. Take the time to ensure that you won't be scammed.

Reference Links:

submitted by EastLight to GlobalOffensiveTrade [link] [comments]

I'm sorry ahead of time for being a noobie

For reasons of my own making I'm forced to use Paxfull and local bitcoin. It seems to me that if I buy a green dot moneypak to green dot card, I can get the most money from selling it that way. Thoughts, suggestions. Thanks
submitted by bdubb1111 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[PSA] Common Scams and how to avoid them Megathread

How to look up a user safely and check if they're a scammer:
If the person is messaging you on Steam, click their user picture in the chat window to go to their Steam profile. Right click that page and choose "Copy Page URL" to make sure you have their real Steam profile page. If the person is messaging you on another website, there should be direct (not typed by the user) links to their Steam profile page. From there you can copy the URL from the address bar in your browser.
Then go to SteamRep and paste that copied link into the search bar to bring up their user page. If a user has been marked as a scammer or caution (on a SR member community) it will be listed on this page. It's possible that a user has pending scam reports against them but are not yet marked. To look these up, click the "Search SteamRep Forum" link in the "Search Engine Queries" section on the user's page. Each SR user page also has user-specific links to multiple trading and rep sites, use these rather than trusting any links given to you by a user (see #1).
Other things that indicate a probable scammer or scammer alt account are low games playtime, low backpack value (when buying expensive items), few other games on Steam, private account, and low account age (which shows on their SR page). A lack of fluency in English is also a possible warning sign, but shouldn't be used as a sole reason not to trust someone.
Common Scams
  1. Fake Phishing Links One of the most common scams, this is a technique used by many, even outside of the game. Phishing links look like links to familiar websites, but are actually imitation websites that try to trick you into giving them your account details (Steam and/or email username and password) or download malware that will take your details/control of your computer. With these details the phisher can gain control of the account and lock you out of it by changing account details, then move your items and steam wallet funds to one of the phisher's accounts. Phishers can contact you through Steam, trade sites, and even email so always be careful to check before you click links. Even better is to not click links at all, and navigate to the real page yourself by searching (see top for details). Additionally, a chrome extension written by dmn002 will block several known misspelled websites, but it won't stop all of them. For Firefox users, Jeesecar96 made a userscript to block phishing sites.
  2. Quickswitching This involves the victim thinking they're getting one item but gets another instead. While in a trade, a scammer will put up the desired item. Without the victim noticing, he'll quickly switch it to another item of less value that looks similar. A common attempt is switching an expensive unusual hat with a much cheaper unusual version of that hat; the item will look the same in the trade window but have a different effect. The item might also be renamed so that chat window of the trade that updates when items are removed/added looks less suspicious. After trading, the victim is left with the switched item. This scam often involves misdirection; they'll ask a question in Steam chat so the victim switches windows and then the scammer will swap the item while the victim is typing. They might also ask the victim to add another item or remove one of them, or add and remove many items themselves to mask the visible chatlog from showing that they've switched the item. With updates to Steam trading this has become easier to notice. Any change in items is shown in the trade chatlog and any change after you have readied up on the trade will stop you from accepting the trade. Always take your time in trades, and double check all items after you have clicked "ready".
  3. Bait and Switch 2 complicit scammers go on a trade server, a trade site, or possibly contact people directly. The first advertises that they are paying a very high amount for a specific item (usually rare but not a requirement), a lot more than it is actually worth. The second advertises selling that exact item, for more than it is worth but for less than the other scammer is offering. They pretend to be unaware of each other, hoping that someone gullible will try to make a quick profit by buying the overpriced item from the second scammer with the intent to sell to the first. Once the item has been sold to the victim for the inflated price the two scammers leave the server, close their listings, or block the victim, leaving the victim stuck with the item.
  4. Lending A scammer may ask to borrow a specific item for a short period of time (usually giving some flattering reason to the victim). After the item is given, it won't be returned. Scammers will take advantage of online acquaintances this way if given the chance. Never lend an item you aren't willing to lose to find out if your "friend" is a scammer.
  5. Trading Outside Steam A scammer may offer to purchase a victim's item with something that won't fit in the trade window (usually cash or game codes). They'll ask the victim to go first and claim that they'll give the payment separately after they have the item. Once they have the victim's item they'll simply block the victim. Many times the offer will be very high to attract victims with more greed than sense. If something seems too good to be true it likely is. This is also sometimes accompanied by a fake link (see #1) for rep to show why they deserve to go second in the trade; never trust links the other person gives you. Instead of a fake link, the scammer may impersonate a trusted trader in which case the links would be correct but not belong to the scammer's account. Looking up the potential scammer's info as detailed above (not using the links given to you) can make the impersonation obvious. Always double check before a transaction. There are legitimate transactions with legitimate traders that happen partially outside the trade window, but the possibility of being scammed is very high. SteamRep maintains a list of trusted middlemen, which act as a neutral party to hold the Steam-tradable side of payment while the rest is transferred. Even with a trusted middleman in a cash trade you can still be scammed (see #7), so be careful.
  6. Middleman Injection After a trade that takes place partially outside Steam has been agreed to, a middleman needs to be chosen. The scammer will suggest a trusted middleman that checks out correctly on SteamRep. However, once the victim agrees to the middleman a fake account pretending to be that middleman adds the victim. Once the unaware victim completes their side of the transaction, believing that they are using a trusted middleman, both the scammer and accomplice will delete and block them while keeping the stolen goods. Make sure you personally add the middleman yourself, and independently verify the identity of the person who added you using the instructions above (look up both accounts on SteamRep and compare). If you're not listed in the friends list of the actual trusted middleman, you're dealing with a scammer.
  7. Chargebacks Funds sent over PayPal (and some other sites) can be "charged back", meaning that PayPal revokes the transaction and gives the buyer their money back. Scammers abuse this by making otherwise legitimate transactions then pulling their money back (sometimes months later) so that they get too keep both the items and the cash. To limit your risk of being charged back (if you use PayPal the risk will always be there), make sure the person buying from you has a long history of successful cash transactions without charge backs. Rep threads on SourceOP are trustworthy; to search for a user's rep thread navigate to their SteamRep page and click the "SOP" link in the "Search Engine Queries" section. Comments on one's Steam profile should not be considered rep as they are easily faked and any negative comments can be deleted by the user. It is recommended that (for maximum risk avoidance) that the buyer's cash rep (from a trusted source) should extend far beyond 90 days in the past. Ideally you should never sell to someone with lots of cash rep that only goes back 90 days or less because this is the most common charge back window for PayPal purchases. As a rule of thumb for selling anything of major value, ignore any cash rep made in the last 90 days and ideally their older cash rep should definitely total more than what the current transaction is. This indicates that they are invested in their rep and aren't gaining more by possibly choosing to charge back than they are giving up in historical reputation they've built up. MoneyPak and Bitcoin do not allow for charge backs, these are safer alternatives.
  8. Gambling Any betting or gambling game that relies on trust that the losing party will pay up has the possibility of that party simply choosing not to pay. This is considered scamming. To avoid this, use a trusted middleman to hold each party's items before the game begins. Because any middleman can theoretically scam you the same way once he has your items, be careful who to trust (see #5).
  9. Money Transfer within Steam Many times scammers will attempt to convince the victim that money can be sent directly over Steam, usually as part of some other trade. This is a variant of #5 which relies on the victim not being familiar with Steam Trade/Offers/Market. They may put something in the chat that appears to be an automated payment message or simply convince you that it will happen. The only way currently that money (as Steam wallet funds) can be transferred in Steam is through the Steam Community Market. It cannot be transferred as a result of a trade in Steam or through the Steam Offers interface. If you ever feel unsure about a trade, take a step back and research it. Valve puts out FAQs on all of their trading methods that are explicit about what is allowed and what is not.
submitted by MagneticSe7en to GlobalOffensiveTrade [link] [comments]

Dont you ever get sick of people complaining that its hard to buy bitoin?

All day, day in and day out as i comb the interwebs of Bitcoin i see dozens of new comics, stories, rants, and false complaints that its "too hard to get bitcoin" and that is the problem.
Below i will outline a bunch of reasons why that is nothing but fudder and people are lazy.
1: Buy a MoneyPak at one of over a million retialers 2: go to localbitcoins.com and buy bitcoin
1: Buy a vanilla reload card at one of over a million retialers 2: go to loaclbitcoins.com and buy bitcoin
1: Use your paypal account and buy bitcoins from someone on localbitcoins.com
1: Post an ad on bitcoin talk 2: send payment when someone wants to sell you bitcoin
1: Buy a miner 2: set it up 3: convert electricity into bitcoin
1: hold up a bitcoin QR code at some dumb rally or event 2: get free bitcoin
1: use any number of free bitcoin sites and refer people 2: get free bitcoin
1: say something cool on /bitcoin 2: someone will changetip free bitcoin
1: use any one of HUNDREDS of bitcoin ATM's 2: turn cash into bitcoin
I could keep going but i think the point has been made.
When will people give up with all this nonsense like Bitcoin is some mythical dragon and you have to fight your way into line to ride it. Anybody in the world, almost anywhere, can buy bitcoin in under 10 minutes.
It its that difficult and such a pain to be a part of bitcoin, please feel free to send all your bitcoins to: 1LatheNNRsWhSZBcFvXpkZd1P3Wz4yA3Vz and i will make sure they are well cared for.
submitted by TheWoodCollector to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What is the best way to buy bitcoins (for a 15 year old who's parents won't let him spend money on the internet)

I noticed bitcoin when the price was around $50 per bitcoin, and damn am i regretting not buying any then. I saw it, and then asked my parents if i could buy any, to which their answer was no, because they were afraid of buying anything over the internet; I can't use a full fledged credit card. I have tried redeeming a prepaid mastercard debit card with about $9 to test it out (using virwox via skrill), and it won't accept the card (skrill IS giving me reciepts, but not withdrawing any money). My local gas station does sell paysafecard, so that might be an option, and the walmart sells moneypaks. What would be the best way to buy about $150 in bitcoin?
submitted by pieceofcrumpledpaper to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

NYC filing on Force/Bridge corruption case; additional details on 'alpacino'

The government explains the Force/Bridge corruption case to Judge Forrest and why it shouldn't affect the upcoming NYC trial of Ulbricht, explaining that they intended to completely steer clear of anything related to Nob or the Maryland hit-man case, and Dratel blasts back. The critical bits are: the description of Force/Bridge triangulates the complaint, there's 20 pages of chat logs from DPR et al, and the unredacted journal finally surfaces.
http://www.archive.org/download/gov.uscourts.nysd.422824/gov.uscourts.nysd.422824.227.1.pdf https://www.scribd.com/doc/260502700/Ulbricht-Rec-Doc-227-1 https://www.dropbox.com/s/gqepaijrm8lsqsm/260502700-Ulbricht-Rec-Doc-227-1.pdf
November 21, 2014
...SA Force played no role in the investigation of Silk Road conducted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York (“USAO-SDNY,” or “this Office”), which proceeded on a separate and independent track from the investigation conducted by USAO-Baltimore. Moreover, the Government does not believe that the ongoing investigation of SA Force is in any way exculpatory as to Ulbricht or otherwise material to his defense. However, in an abundance of caution, the Government seeks to disclose the investigation of SA Force to the defense, and therefore respectfully requests a protective order authorizing the Government to do so pursuant to Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 6(e)(3)(E) and prohibiting the defense from disclosing the investigation to any third-party.
...USAO-San Francisco began investigating SA Force in the spring of this year after learning of suspicious transactions he had had with a certain Bitcoin exchange company with a presence in San Francisco.
...SA Force is also being investigated for leaking investigative information to Ulbricht through a different Silk Road username – “alpacino” (or “albertpacino” or “pacino”). A file recovered from Ulbricht’s laptop titled “le_counter_intel” (i.e., “law enforcement counter intelligence”) contains extensive records of communications that appear under the heading “correspondence with alpacino.” The communications purport to be from someone claiming to be “in the perfect spot to play spy for Silk Road with the DEA.” Like the correspondence from “french maid,” these communications reflect inside knowledge of USAO-Baltimore’s investigation of Silk Road. Further evidence indicates that Ulbricht paid “alpacino” a salary of $500 per week to supply such information. Accordingly, USAO-San Francisco is investigating whether SA Force controlled this username as well and exploited it to exchange investigative information to Ulbricht for payment in Bitcoins. 2
...Approximately one week later, on January 26, 2013, the “Flush” account appears to have been used to steal approximately $350,000 in Bitcoins from Silk Road. 4 “Dread Pirate Roberts” messaged “Flush” on January 26, 2013, accusing him of stealing the money and warning that he was “taking appropriate action.” Subsequent private messages from the Silk Road Server and chats recovered from Ulbricht’s computer reflect that Ulbricht subsequently recruited a Silk Road user he knew as “nob” to have Green killed in retaliation for the theft. The “nob” account, as noted above, was an undercover account controlled by SA Force...According to an investigative report filed by SA Force, Green claimed not to know anything about the theft. The report states: “GREEN has telephoned SA Force on numerous occasions and advised that he has been ‘racking his brain’ about the supposed theft of $350,000 from DREAD PIRATE ROBERTS. Note, DREAD PIRATE ROBERTS is accusing GREEN of stealing the money. GREEN believes that there is a glitch in the website and that somebody hacked into the SILK ROAD marketplace and stole the Bitcoin.”
To be clear, the Government does not believe that this disclosure is required under Rule 16 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure or under Brady v. Maryland, 373 U.S. 83 (1963). The suspected criminal conduct for which SA Force is being investigated – even if he did in fact commit the conduct – does not exculpate Ulbricht in any way or otherwise materially aid his defense. To the contrary, the suspected leaks of investigative information by SA Force indicate that Ulbricht repeatedly paid a government agent to provide “counter-intelligence” information in the interest of protecting Silk Road from law enforcement. Likewise, regardless of whether SA Force or someone else stole $350,000 through the “Flush” account in January 2013, the facts remain that Ulbricht believed that his employee, Curtis Green, had stolen the funds, and that Ulbricht sought to murder Green for doing so. Finally, any personal use of payments that SA Force received through his undercover “nob” account reflects only corruption on SA Force’s part, rather than anything suggestive of Ulbricht’s innocence.
...Nor does the Government intend to use at trial any communications between Ulbricht and SA Force that were found on the Silk Road Server and Ulbricht’s laptop – even though these communications include highly incriminating exchanges reflecting Ulbricht’s hiring of “nob” to arrange the murder of Curtis Green. 6
From the prosecution:
Finally, as asserted previously, the Court should not exclude evidence of the false identification documents under Rule 403. (Id. at 18-19). The evidence regarding Ulbricht’s attempts to obtain fraudulent identification documents is highly probative, and his attempts to obtain nine fake identification documents on a single occasion are not any more “sensational or disturbing” than the scope of the alleged offenses in this case, which include a large-scale narcotics trafficking conspiracy, among other things, such that there would be any legitimate risk that the evidence will “arouse irrational passions” among the jurors. (Id. at 19).
Unclear if the 9 refers to the US IDs from KoC (of which I think there was 9, IIRC, based on the 3x3 photo arrangement I recall) or the UK fake IDs deal with Nob/LE which fell through.
The allegations against SA Force do not tend to prove either of the essential elements of an entrapment defense, including: (1) government inducement of the crime and (2) a lack of predisposition on the part of the defendant to engage in criminal conduct. See United States v. Kopstein, 759 F.3d 168, 173 (2d Cir. 2014). Even if SA Force is found to have stolen the Bitcoins, he at most caused a situation to which the defendant chose to respond to with violence, which is wholly insufficient to prove an entrapment defense. United States v. Cromitie, 727 F.3d 194, 204 (2d Cir. 2013) (“The fact that officers or employees of the Government merely afford opportunities or facilities for the commission of the offense does not defeat the prosecution.”). Chat logs obtained from the defendant’s computer plainly indicate that “Nob” (i.e., SA Force), did not induce Ulbricht’s decision to order “Flush” killed; rather, the decision to solicit “Flush’s” murder originated from the defendant himself, during conversations he had with co-conspirators “cimon” and “Inigo.” Relevant excerpts of the chat logs reflecting discussions between the defendant, SA Force as “Nob,” “Inigo,” and “cimon” regarding Flush are attached as Exhibit A. Those chat logs indicate that: (1) “Inigo” first discovered the theft of the Bitcoins via the “Flush” account and reported it to Ulbricht, and Ulbricht reported the theft to Nob (pp. 1-2); (2) Ulbricht identified “Flush” to “Nob” as Curtis Green and asked if he could arrange to “get someone to force him to return the stolen funds” (p. 5); (3) “Nob” replied by asking in an open-ended fashion whether Ulbricht wanted him “beat up, shot, just paid a visit,” and the defendant responded at the time by instructing “Nob” to arrange to have Green “beat up” (p. 5); (4) “cimon” initiated a discussion with Ulbricht about whether they should consider executing Green, and Ulbricht eventually agreed (pp. 11-13); (5) the very next time that Ulbricht spoke with Nob, Ulbricht, unprompted, requested that Nob change the order from “torture to execute,” even after Nob told Ulbricht that beating Green up would not cost Ulbricht anything, but that Ulbricht would have to pay for a murder for hire (pp. 18-20); and (6) Nob quoted a price of $80,000 in United States currency for the hit, to which Ulbricht agreed (p. 21). As noted in the Force Letter, the Government does not intend to use the portions of the chat logs involving Nob at trial, even though the logs are highly inculpatory.
Chat logs between inigo/cimon/DPNob span pg31-51; I'm amused how they ultimately stopped Force:
(2013-01-26 10:58) inigo (laptop): i noticed it as soon as he started, luckily, but it took me a few hours to figure out what was happeneing and realize how to stop it (2013-01-26 10:58) myself: how did you stop it? (2013-01-26 10:58) inigo (laptop): by resetting the password to his account (2013-01-26 10:58) myself: oh, smart (2013-01-26 10:58) inigo (laptop): as soon as i did that the stealing stopped 
Inigo was cashing out with MoneyPaks via 'sugar mama'?
(2013-01-26 11:04) inigo (laptop): it was sheer luck that i noticed it, i had sent my coins to sugar mama to cash out my paycheck, and i kept looking her up to see if she was back online because im flat broke and was really antsy for her to send me the MP codes (which she still hasnt done thanks to this mess) and then i noticed her balance drop to 0, and she made a forum post about it 
What 'guy in Africa'?
(2013-01-26 11:17) myself: I'd like him beat up, then forced to send the bitcoins he stole back. like sit him down at his computer and make him do it (2013-01-26 11:17) myself: beat up only if he doesn't comply I guess (2013-01-26 11:17) myself: not sure how these things usually go (2013-01-26 11:18) Nob: remember that guy in Africa? you wanted me to put a gun to that guy's head while he is logged on SR and take a picture. you want that? (2013-01-26 11:18) myself: no thanks 
Today we learn Inigo was almost as good at doxing as Lamoustache:
(2013-01-26 13:35) inigo (laptop): just to confirm that he gave you his real ID, i was able to aquire what i believe to be his identity from the info he revealed to me (2013-01-26 13:35) myself: oh really? (2013-01-26 13:35) inigo (laptop): i made him as Curtis Green from , Utag (2013-01-26 13:35) inigo (laptop): utah (2013-01-26 13:35) myself: yep (2013-01-26 13:35) myself: how'd you manage that? (2013-01-26 13:35) inigo (laptop): ok good so that wasn't a fake id (2013-01-26 13:35) inigo (laptop): he told me about this website that he owns (2013-01-26 13:36) myself: what is it? (2013-01-26 13:36) inigo (laptop): .com (2013-01-26 13:36) inigo (laptop): he was trying to recuit me to this multi level marketing scam (2013-01-26 13:36) inigo (laptop): so today i looked up who owns that site (2013-01-26 13:37) myself: this guy is an idiot (2013-01-26 13:37) inigo (laptop): he also owns a company called anytime airport shuttle or something like that (2013-01-26 13:37) inigo (laptop): yeah (2013-01-26 13:37) inigo (laptop): i found his twitter account too (2013-01-26 13:37) inigo (laptop): had a picture of the SR logo as his profile pic (2013-01-26 13:37) inigo (laptop): i couldn't believe it 
So close, yet so far:
(2013-01-27 00:58) cimon: yeah, he's been busted for coke. Write off the money, no way I'd send anyone in there, or go myself, with that kind of heat, especially since he may still roll on SR for leniency. (2013-01-27 00:58) myself: ok (2013-01-27 00:58) myself: i just hate getting ripped off (2013-01-27 00:58) cimon: HOWEVER, it certainly fucking gives nob a wee bit o' credibility. (2013-01-27 00:59) myself: yea, nobs legit, but not quite as big time as he was making himself out to be 
Yes, the best that money can buy - top men, top men!
(2013-01-27 01:25) inigo (laptop): i can only imagine the kind of person you turn to for advice ... myself: I have excellent advisors 
I give up:
(2013-01-27 01:34) myself: you wanna know one of my deepest fears in all of this (2013-01-27 01:35) inigo (laptop): what's that (2013-01-27 01:35) myself: being wildly successful (2013-01-27 01:35) myself: and becoming extremely powerful (2013-01-27 01:35) myself: and being corrupted by that power 
I take back my earlier comments, I wouldn't mind too much if VJ/cimon got caught - he pushed for murdering Green nonstop:
(2013-01-27 01:53) cimon: You would have surprised me if you had balked at taking the step, of bluntly, killing Curtis for fucking up just a wee bit too badly. Also, if you had balked, I would have seriously re-considered our relationship. We're playing for keeps, this just drives it home. I'm perfectly comfortable with the decision, and I'll sleep like a lamb tonight, and every night hereafter. 
As Mad-Eye Moody might say - INSUFFICIENTLY PARANOID!
(2013-01-27 02:07) cimon: OK, there is one alternate approach that kills two birds with one stone, so to speak. Tell nob, OK, why don't you deal with the problem, just not for at least one week. Get the guy who knows a guy to get some guys in place to bat clean-up if the first string fucks it up. Same result, and I'd be pretty sure nobs not a fed then. (2013-01-27 02:08) cimon: IF he's a fed, nothing happens. If he's incompetent, we take out his team and finish the task. (2013-01-27 02:08) cimon: Either way, valuable things would be learned. 
Way too late, dude:
(2013-01-27 16:31) cimon: well ok then, I think we should take observer status here. (2013-01-27 16:31) cimon: If you think about it, it REALLY doesn't look good on nob if a guy he sold to immediately gets buseted (2013-01-27 16:32) myself: yea, his response was "this is why I ask them to do drops instead of through the mail" 
Also, that's not actually any evidence against Nob being LE, him saying something about drops...
Previously: https://www.reddit.com/DarkNetMarkets/comments/30ua10/2_federal_agent_embezzlement_complaint_excerpts/
submitted by gwern to SilkRoad [link] [comments]

Legit places to buy bitcoin with credit card or moneypak(or similar)?

It seems like one by one all the good sites that allow credit card purchases are having issues.
There are a few places I've been unable to determine the legitimacy of like CEO.IX . They have multiple problems on their mining side, but I have seen no complaints about simply buying bitcoin from them with CC.
Can anyone point me in the right direction? I'm fine jumping through some verification hoops like sending videos of myself holding my cards, but I'm tired of doing it for a company that only allows a tiny amount of money to be used.
submitted by Halsfield to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

question about bitcoins?

is there any vendors on any makrkets that sells bitcoins using like moneypak or whatever method of payment like BTCking on sr1. If you buy from a vendor and have them deposit coins in your DNM address wallet do you still need to tumble coins using lit bitcoin fog
submitted by jakefromstatefarm00 to SilkRoad [link] [comments]

[H] Treasure Keys [W] Forms of Cash Payment

I prefer Bitcoins, Moneypak, Bank Transfers, or Western Union Otherwise I will only sell to buyers with lots of rep and a verified Paypal account. If you are using Paypal the fees will be paid by the buyer and Paypal payment should be made using the option "I'm sending money to family and friends" Discounts are available to those who buy in bulk and are willing to use Bitcoin, bank transfers, MoneyPak or Western Union. Feel free to add me to discuss. QTY Available : 1000+ , $1.9 each
http://dota2traders.com/forum/thread/76561198111283724-bright-sigils-reputation-thread.92163/[1]
submitted by Pumping_Irony to Dota2Trade [link] [comments]

is there a way for me to turn money on a visa giftcard into bitcoins?

Ive never used bitcoin before, but I'm trying to get a seedbox and the fucking visa wont work internationally. I then tried paypal and i had to refund my moneypak. So now I'm suck with 23something dollars and I need 0.232 bitcoin to buy this thing. I'm sick jumping through all these hurdles just to get a goddamn seedbox. Is there a simple way I can do this?
submitted by amazingme5999 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Table] IAmA: I'm the CEO of an online underground black market, AMA

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2013-06-08
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Questions Answers
Aren't you worried about bringing more attention to your site by doing something like an AMA rather then just relying on word of mouth? By doing something like this don't you run the risk of law enforcement agencies paying more attention to the fact that you exist? We want to bring attention to the site and bring our vendors more buyers. Law enforcement is going to be aware of us (and probably already is) regardless of the way we choose to put our product out there.
What made you decide to go into the business of running such a site? Just the money? Or other reasons? It was the appeal of providing a service that we believe in and a business decision. Prohibition is a backwards process.
We have taken technical measures to prevent and offset these risks if they arise. As for our identities being revealed, if a competitor is able to do it then law enforcement would be able to do it. That would be of a larger concern to us. We take many measures to protect our identity.
There are many legal items for sale as well, but the bulk of our items are drug related. We have no preference over what gets sold (assuming it does not break our restricted items rules).
We are indeed. We're looking for a web marketeSEO willing to be paid in Bitcoin.
Im curious as somewhat of amateur SEO marketer, how does one market a Tor Site? Surely it can't be done in regular ways such as adwords, keyword optimization, etc, etc. It is true that we can't use regular methods however we are after a person who can make YouTube how-to videos, create forum posts in various communities to increase the exposure to our site.
I've done some marketing and SEO, so just drop me a PM if you still need somebody. Thanks for your interest plerer, please PM us with your experience.
So how many inboxes have you gotten from people asking for jobs? If you aren't sick of them already, I'm interested in at least more information. I'll send a message should you reply to this. We've received about 20, but we're still looking.
Are you looking for resumes, cv's? how are you choosing a candidate? Based off previous work, and whatever data the applicant is comfortable providing.
What are your restricted items? And why don't you allow people to sell them? Restricted items include anything related to paedophilia, poisons, loans, investment opportunities, assassination services or anything which can inflict harm on another person. If you infringe on these rules we will terminate your account instantly.
Trading any digital currencies (for example Bitcoins, Litecoins, Ukash, Moneypak, Western Union, Moneygram, etc) is forbidden and will result in the items being removed and a warning or ban being issued to the vendor. This is to prevent scams.
The trading of counterfeit money is forbidden, and will result in a warning or ban being issued.
We also do not allow listings for 0.01 in the money section. Your items must have a full cost associated to them to prevent people processing transactions outside of the escrow system.
We allow the purchase of physical fiat for Bitcoins and/or Litecoins (has to be legitimate currency; not counterfeit). This is the only exception to the currency rule. We do not, however, allow the reverse of these transactions i.e. customers mailing vendors real currency as this is outside the escrow system.
As an example, if you were a vendor and you wanted to buy $1000 worth of Bitcoins/Litecoins you could do so by making a listing for $1000 labelled "Buying $1000 worth of Bitcoins/Litecoins", and then mail the real currency to the purchaser of your listing in exchange for their Bitcoins/Litecoins that are currently travelling through the escrow system.
Why are investment opportunities banned? Because they're commonly used as scam tactics.
What about fake Ids? Can you guys make/sell those? Our vendors sell a lot of those.
Why is counterfeit money banned? Part of the "harm to others" rule? It's frequently used in scams. When we allowed it, 100% of the counterfeit money sales were scams. It's also hurting local businesses etc.
Would you mind posting a link to the be-all, end-all, one stop tutorial installation page to safely and securely start using TOR, Bitcoin and Atlantis? 1) Download and install the Tor browser bundle - Link to www.torproject.org 2) Download and install the Bitcoin client - Link to bitcoin.org 3) You'll need to obtain some Bitcoins. The most popular exchange is MtGox (www.mtgox.com). They offer a few ways in which you can convert your local currency to Bitcoins. 4) Using the Tor browser, visit Atlantis (URL can be found at /Atlantis) 6) Click on the deposit BTC link under account settings and transfer your Bitcoins to that address. You'll need to wait for 1-2 hours before the transfer propagates across the network. 7) You can then shop for any items you would like whilst being confident on security and privacy.
Someone help me with step 3? Its just telling me I cant open the program. That step is optional, you don't HAVE to use PGP. Especially if you just plan on having a browse.
Just commenting to find this later. )
Can you send me some drugs? Edit: Not a cop. Our vendors can.
How do you rate yourself compared to the road? We've had no downtime.
Our site is much more responsive.
We have cheaper commission rates allowing sellers to make more profit on their sales and buyers to buy them for cheaper.
We have automated PGP encryption of messages for the members who refuse to send their messages using PGP. We have an advancement fan management system, allowing sellers to reach out to all of their customers.
We have a more 'modern' user interface.
We have buyer feedback (none of the other marketplaces have this functionality).
We have an anonymous feedback system that allows you to determine is feedback is fake, but at the same time does not reveal anything about your buying patterns.
We support Litecoin as well as Bitcoin (the first market to support multiple currencies).
We listen to our user feedback, we have a rapid development cycle and new features are constantly being improved upon and added.
I'd like to personally thank you guys for everything you do to make online drug purchasing a safer and better experience. +altcointip 1 ltc. That's very kind of you, thank you! :-)
We've had no downtime. What do you say to all of the rumors that you were funding the DDoS aimed at the Road when your site first came online to pull traffic? We released an official statement regarding those accusations, it can be found on our forum. In short: We had nothing to do with it. It was speculative rumor.
What are you doing to cut down on scams and discrimination against new buyers? If your rules are that vendors are not supposed to deal outside of escrow, what are you doing about those vendors who require it in their policies? > "Yes we have caught scammers, but we've banned them swiftly. We pushed out new changes earlier that helps reduce the number of scams, all feedback contains the amount of the purchase, preventing users from leaving fake feedback on $0.01 listings. It also contains an 'anonymous' user ID so sellers/buyers can confirm whether the user leaving feedback has left feedback before. This helps catch scammers leaving fake feedback. The ID is unique to the sellebuyer combination, so it cannot be traced across transactions to determine a buyers buying patterns."
Further to the above we've made it easy to report suspicious vendors, there's a button directly on their profile that will notify support.
In regard to the vendors that require it in their policies, they will be warned or banned if they request FE without meeting our FE requirements (a minimum of 30 5/5 transactions). This system has already saved countless people from scammers.
New buyers are encouraged to purchase small orders first to build their reputation and feedback and find vendors who are pleasant to deal with. I haven't seen a problem of buyer discrimination yet (apart from on scammer profiles saying 'you must FE because you have no feedback').
If I am not mistaken, the Black Market Reloaded also has buyer feedback. Not that I would know, as I never go to such sites... I'm not sure, but I've heard its a haven for scammers, and they have no escrow process.
How about weighting reviews based on the amount of funds transferred? E.g., a $10 transaction review is worth 10x the review of a $1 transaction. This is a good idea, however this would impact the freshness of the feedback if we sort it by the value.
Aren't you worried the authorities are tracking this ama? They probably are. We aren't worried.
Why did you decided to accept Litecoin first? Also do you think Litecoin price will go up because of your site? Also how long did it take to prepare and set everything up? We wanted to promote Litecoin because it has a few awesome improvements over Bitcoin, so we started with Litecoin. I think a lot of the value has come from Atlantis already, and more will come from Atlantis with our growth. It's taken a year to get the site where it is at the moment with a few developers working on it mostly full time.
I've checked out atlantis, purely out of curiosity. I don't do drugs at all, but it seems that the prices are higher than street prices. Why do people prefer to buy on Atlantis? Is it due to knowing they're getting good quality? It seems riskier than buying drugs on the street. Greater quality, ease of access, safer than dealing with unknowns on the streets. A lot of people don't have access to a friendly in-person dealer.
The prices vary, some are actually cheaper then what you can find on the street.
Some of the main reasons why people choose to purchase off Atlantis include;
1) Quality of the merchandise. Because of the sites feedback and reputation system, you can be certain that you will be receiving an unadulterated item.
2) Order in the comfort of your own home and have the parcel delivered to you (with tracking).
3) Thousands of items to choose from. Sometimes a local dealer will not have a product you are after.
4) Deal with currencies which can be used to purchase items without the reliance of fiat.
5) Encrypted correspondence, more secure then messaging/calling your local dealer.
So how is it possible to get delivery anonymously? i mean, at some point don't you have to give your name and address to the seller? And if they are ever busted and you are in their database as a customer; aren't you kinda...you know...fucked? Thanks for the AMA by the way. Some purchasers use fake names to hide their identity, others don't. We have a strict rule where vendors must remove all information about their clients once the parcel has been shipped (e.g from their computer). Also, once the order has been shipped, the address is automatically purged from our database.
How do you enforce a rule like that? what's to stop a vendor from simply writing an address down on a sticky note? Unfortunately we can't enforce it, we can only advise them to do it. Our system also permanently deletes this information after first viewing.
So...you're an online drug dealer? How is this legal or how are you skirting laws to keep yourself from prosecution? I don't know of any countries/territories where selling Heroin would be legal. We're not a dealer, we provide the platform for dealers to sell their products in a secure environment. The Tor network hides our service from government officials. You can have a look into "Tor hidden services" if you're interested.
How do you usually guarantee the safety of your "company' and the buyer? We use a Tor hidden service to hide our service from the prying eyes of government officials: Link to www.torproject.org
Do you ever deliver in bulk? This allows our servers IP address and location to remain hidden.
Are there any suppliers that you deal where they are a legal company on the surface? Users must access our site using the Tor hidden browser, protecting their identity: Link to www.torproject.org
What are your personal political views? What about certain topics like child pornography, necrophilia or any other cultural taboos that are usually at the expense of another unwilling person? We don't deliver anything, but our sellers commonly deliver in bulk. We facilitate the platform, the sellers are from the general public.
What are your top non-drug related products? See above.
Is your company white collarish or do you have people who work with you that use violence and intimidation? We do not allow listings such as child pornography and necrophilia. We do take a moral stance, there's a large difference between child pornography and drugs.
Is government bribery common with your company? Probably porn.
We don't use violence or intimidation, nor do we have any need to. We're an online platform. The idea is to move away from the violent streets.
No, that doesn't happen (or hasn't happened yet).
Oh I see so basically your site is like the middle man am I correct? Alright that does make a lot of my questions moot. That's correct.
Have you had any scares before? None.
How illegal is Atlantis? I mean, not for the vendors/buyers, but how illegal is it as the CEO of the website? (Basically, how much trouble would YOU get into, if shit hit the fan?) Google "farmers market bust" for an example.
What did those men do wrong, and do you think you've solved to that issue? A lot of silly mistakes and using very traceable means of trade.
A screenshot of a website doesn't really prove anything. Do you have any proof that you are the CEO of this company? I've added a link to the AMA on the footer of the website.
Without going into any personal details (obviously) what brought you to this biz? I.e. formal versus informal education... comp sci vs. Mba-type edu... or whatever ur able to say. Can't go into education specifics sorry.
Also, as someone who is intrigued and has made half-assed attempts to get a bit/litecoin account setup and given up after hitting various obstacles, am I right to assess your biggest barrier to growth are the hurdles customers need to jump through to make transactions? Or am I just a stupid brain? If you'd like any assistance getting set up let us know, we can point you in the right direction. The seeming complexity of cryptocurrency is definitely a barrier to growth. It's all relatively simple once you get your head around it though. Bitcoins/Litecoins are far easier to obtain in certain countries than others.
Do you keep lawyers on retainer? We have a few lawyers using our platform to offer legal advice for a fee.
Hi. I have never posted/commented on reddit before, after about 5 years of being a lurker. This is too cool an opportunity not to. It's progressed to a full time job for us at this point. There isn't a day we aren't working on Atlantis.
How many hours a week on average do you work? What do you do outside of work for fun? What kind of music do you listen to? I'd love to answer those questions but they're a bit revealing sorry.
What is the biggest security threat you have had? We did a lot of planning in relation to this and haven't had any security issues so far. Our biggest concern would be if a security flaw was discovered in the technology we rely on (e.g flaw in the onion routing protocol or the Bitcoin protocol).
I've heard these sites are much more common than people realize. How much traffic do you guys get? We're one of the largest markets, and the most refined. We get thousands of visitors and hundreds of orders are processed through Atlantis a day.
How come you can post this here and not be instantly arrested? Link to www.torproject.org
Link to en.wikipedia.org
What does one sell on a black market that falls under the "Home & Garden" section...? Ikea lamps...
And nutrient dense soil, growing equipment, CFL's, HPS lamps, etc.
Why do buy / sell these types of items on the black market rather than any major online retailer? Since we use cryptocurrencies its a good way for people to use them to buy other items. Think of it like eBay but with a twist.
Are you worried that your usage of Tor contributes to undermining its image as a legitimate utility for online anonymity, in the same way that Bittorrent is often immediately associated with piracy? We hope that our usage does not tarnish its perception of being a legitimate tool. The core of our operation is to give people access to a 'true free market' whilst still protecting our users and ourselves. However just like a knife - it can be used for good and for bad.
We can only hope that the media and government doesn't portray Tor as a tool used by 'terrorists and criminals'.
Have you caught any scammers yet? Yes we have caught scammers, but we've banned them swiftly. We pushed out new changes earlier that helps reduce the number of scams, all feedback contains the amount of the purchase, preventing users from leaving fake feedback on $0.01 listings. It also contains an 'anonymous' user ID so sellers/buyers can confirm whether the user leaving feedback has left feedback before. This helps catch scammers leaving fake feedback. The ID is unique to the sellebuyer combination, so it cannot be traced across transactions to determine a buyers buying patterns.
Whilst you have swiftly banned sellers, can't they just make a new account? With the nature of TOR you couldn't ban their IP could you? That is correct, we cannot ban them by IP (there is no distinction on the Tor network). They would need to pay a new vendor account fee every time they create a new vendor account.
What are you doing to cut down on scams and discrimination against new buyers? We have implemented a few metrics in the feedback system, these include;
1) Buyer and seller feedback, rated in quality (out of 5).
2) Total purchases made.
3) Account age.
4) Item price in feedback history.
5) User hash which allows people to identify if the buyer is unique or the same person leaving fake feedback whilst still keeping their username anonymous.
We are currently working on two new metrics, these include;
1) Was the parcel received.
2) The users historic purchase total.
Unfortunately new buyers will always be a risk for vendors however with parcel tracking and the escrow system, these risks can be mitigated.
What's the best selling item? The most popular item is Cannabis.
What non-legal things other than drugs are done through your site specifically what's the most common things non-drug? Popular non-legal items other then typical illicit drugs include money handling services, identity services (generating passports) and cybercrime (malware).
The most common popular legal items include books, digital goods, legal money services and erotica.
So the site says I can get a FREE half gram of hash... do they actually send you that? Yes, vendors commonly offer free incentives to gather good reputation at the beginning of their seller career.
How did you get your first customers ? How did you advertise the site like this in the first place and create the initial market base? We posted an announcement in two cryptocurrency community forums and the news spread quite quickly.
We also offered incentives for vendors at other market places to sign up and take advantage of trading with no commission fees.
Where does your revenue come from, if you have no commission fees? Is it purely from cost associated with becoming a vendor? When we were running the 3 month commission free special, our income solely came from the vendor registration fee.
Our current commission structure can be seen below;
Value less than or equal to $50 6% Value less than or equal to $150 5.5% Value less than or equal to $300 5% Value less than or equal to $500 2% Value less than or equal to $1000 1.5% Value greater than $1000 1%
Do you have a retirement plan? Like quit and let someone else take over in a year? Everyone does gets busted in the end. Hell even anonymous. Usually via neverending greed or pride. We don't plan on retiring anytime soon, we've only just begun :)
How much do you make ?(give us a range ?) Is the money vs risk worth it ? Unfortunately we can't give you specifics on how much we earn however all of our profits have been used to enhance our platform. We take more pride in forming a true free market place rather than the dollars earned.
That's actually pretty cool, thanks. Oh also what made you want to get into this buisness? We love cryptocurrency, libertarianism, technology and saw an opportunity to make a free market place when SR was experiencing frequent down time.
Are you a regular customer at Atlantis yourself and what do/did you buy? We do everything on Atlantis except for buying products on it ;)
What is the craziest item you have ever sold? The top two items would be used sex toys/underwear (female vendor) and fig tree cuttings.
Fig tree cuttings? Can't someone just buy that on Ebay? O.o The ones from Atlantis are prettier.
How pure is the coke? It depends on the vendor. They advertise the purity on their product, the majority of it seems to be in the 85% range.
Why would the purity matter, and wouldn't someone prefer 100% pure over something that was cut with other items? Purity matters because you require less of the drug to get the same effect. Other than that it's mostly irrelevant. Yes, you would prefer 100% purity. 85% purity is very high compared to most street cocaine. On average, street cocaine is around 50% purity.
What exactly is usually put in cocaine other than coke to dilute the purity? Benzocaine, Caffeine, Phenacetin and sugars are the most common impurities.
Doesn't "CEO" relate to corporate organizational stucture? Why is a black market operating as a legal company would? We're still an organization and an organization requires leadership.
What's up with al the cats??? Incognito mode.
How much does your physical location matter to run a business like yours? Would it be any easieharder if you were in say, Somalia or on a ship in the ocean in International waters? We have team members in various different countries. I would say physical location is relatively irrelevant. We can access our systems from anywhere, and our location and the server location is protected by the Tor hidden service network.
Is there anything that you will not sell on your website? Restricted items.
Restricted items include anything related to paedophilia, poisons, loans, investment opportunities, assassination services or anything which can inflict harm on another person. If you infringe on these rules we will terminate your account instantly.
Trading any digital currencies (for example Bitcoins, Litecoins, Ukash, Moneypak, Western Union, Moneygram, etc) is forbidden and will result in the items being removed and a warning or ban being issued to the vendor. This is to prevent scams. (See exceptions below for exceptions to this rule).
The trading of counterfeit money is forbidden, and will result in a warning or ban being issued.
We also do not allow listings for 0.01 in the money section. Your items must have a full cost associated to them to prevent people processing transactions outside of the escrow system.
We allow the purchase of physical fiat for Bitcoins and/or Litecoins (has to be legitimate currency; not counterfeit). This is the only exception to the currency rule. We do not, however, allow the reverse of these transactions i.e. customers mailing vendors real currency as this is outside the escrow system.
As an example, if you were a vendor and you wanted to buy $1000 worth of Bitcoins/Litecoins you could do so by making a listing for $1000 labelled "Buying $1000 worth of Bitcoins/Litecoins", and then mail the real currency to the purchaser of your listing in exchange for their Bitcoins/Litecoins that are currently travelling through the escrow system.
Regarding the IT infrastructure, Do you own the servers that host the website? How are the servers connected to the internet? Is it a corporate leased line or just some dodgy hacked cable modem :) Without going to depth, we use dedicated servers provided by a hosting company. All servers are equipped with a 100Mbit WAN link.
I'm probably misunderstanding Tor a bit here then, but how come the hosting company doesn't get into hot water and told to stop hosting Atlantis? Tor traffic looks similar to SSL and our hosting provider doesn't snoop on our servers :-)
Do you pay for that in bitcoins? Is the server encrypted such that someone with physical access couldn't discover its contents, should they choose to? We pay for the servers via anonymous methods and the disks are encrypted. However when running certain applications, the vulnerable point would be RAM.
I'm not sure if the second is possible whilst also offering an internet service, you must have unencrypted stuff in RAM? We also monitor the data center for unauthorized access.
. To me hosting seems to be the weakest link in your personal security (I'm sure users are fine with your encrypted messages). Have you considered distributed hosting on other darknets like freenet? For all the services we offer, we have redundant servers ready to fail over to.
I hope i'm not late to the party, but do you have any thoughts/reactions towards the current chatter regarding PRISM and the NSA? Maybe you can talk about some precautions you took or are taking as a result? Never too late. It's quite scary actually. Tor, SSL, PGP, OTR, all of these technologies are your friends.
Although I will say this is nothing new, the NSA has been doing this for years now. I guess it's finally caught up to them.
We haven't started taking any new precautions as a result, we were already using them.
Would you say that those tools are your friends even if you're not interested in anything too illegal? Props for your efforts though, must be interesting to run that kind of company :) Definitely, with PRISM making headlines this week its always good to protect your privacy.
What is the airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow? I believe it's 11 meters per second.
Had anyone ever been caught in sting operation? We haven't had any incidents reported to us yet (most vendors are very careful and security conscious) however we have read a case in the past where a vendor was caught on a different market place. The market place wasn't to blame, it was just that the vendor wasn't careful with his operation and thus got discovered.
Whats a "virtual credit card"? Prepaid virtual credit cards aren't issued by a bank, have no contract, usually have a set amount and can be used online.
Can't access your site (yet) but do you have vendors in Australia? We have a few Australian vendors, yes.
You're probably not still around, but is it even possible to order items on your site from Japan? I have not even looked at Atlantis or SR because I don't think it's even possible. To my knowledge yes. But don't quote me on that. I think I remember seeing a few Japanese located vendors.
How does a typical black market starts up? For us, we love cryptocurrency, libertarianism, technology and saw an opportunity to make a free market place when SR was experiencing frequent down time.
When deciding for your brand or website name. What other names did you consider besides Atlantis? I like the name it has now just curious to know of the brainstorming behind the site. Also I love your website! Thank you! I can't actually remember any of the other names we considered, probably because they were all bad. Atlantis stuck from the beginning!
And you're welcome, thanks for using it.
Last updated: 2013-06-12 05:44 UTC
This post was generated by a robot! Send all complaints to epsy.
submitted by tabledresser to tabled [link] [comments]

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